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District Graduation Rate Continues Rise

Did you hear? Highline’s graduation rate has risen for the third year in a row, to nearly 75 percent for the Class of 2016. The official graduation rate of 74.8 percent represents a jump of more than 12 points in two years. The increase comes at a time when standards for graduation are higher than ever and increasing numbers of Highline students are taking challenging, advanced coursework. 

 

Here’s some evidence that students are meeting higher standards:  

 

·         Classroom instruction is based on new, more rigorous state learning standards that challenge students to learn at higher levels than previous state standards.

 

·         Increasing numbers of Highline secondary students are enrolled in challenging coursework, such as Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB).  Last year, 941 students took AP classes. Seventy-four percent of last year’s seniors took at least one AP or IB class. Students at all four main high school campuses took advantage of expanded computer science offerings, an option few high schools in Washington offer.

 

·         In order to meet state graduation requirements, all students must demonstrate their learning on the Smarter Balanced Assessment and other state exams, which are more challenging than past state exams, or must complete a state-approved alternative.

 

·         Highline’s credit requirements are higher than the state’s. The state requires 20 high school credits for graduation; Highline students must earn 23 credits to graduate.

 

“I am inspired by the work of our dedicated teachers and staff, who hold our students to high expectations, by the hard work of our students, and by the support our students receive from their families and our community. Our rising graduation rate is evidence that our students are capable of achieving the bold goals our community has set for them,” said Superintendent Susan Enfield. “We are moving in the right direction, and we will not stop until we meet our target of at least 19 out of 20 students graduating prepared to choose their future.”

 

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